Call Us: (440) 427-4656

S2E19- Rookie Mistakes Pt 2.

16
Sep

S2E19- Rookie Mistakes Pt 2.

Like what you hear? Share it with someone you know!

(Show notes – 0:00 – 9:00)

Shanna Tokarsky:
Hey, yeah. Welcome back to the Unbroken Athletic Podcast. We are here with Season 2, Episode 19. This is a series that we are in the middle of right now. So this is our second episode on mistakes that athletes athletes make. And it’s called rookie mistakes. But honestly, this is probably mistakes that we see with veteran athletes and rookie athletes as well. So it’s not just for rookies. So that’s important to know because I think sometimes we get in the rut like, hey, well, I’m a veteran. I’ve been doing this for five years or two years or three years. So I don’t need to listen to this.

Jeremie Tokarsky:
You’re always a rookie.

Shanna Tokarsky:
Yeah, that’s true. If you’re always learning and always growing, then technically you’re always a rookie and there’s always room for improvement. So that’s our mindset. That’s what we believe here at Unbroken Athletic. So today or last week, let’s do a quick recap on what we talked about last week. And if you didn’t listen to that episode, maybe go back if maybe these are some of the things that you struggle with. No one was.

Jeremie Tokarsky:
Not eating enough

Shanna Tokarsky:
not eating enough are eating too much of the wrong stuff.

Jeremie Tokarsky:
Two was focusing on weight over technique. And three was overtraining. If you want to know more about those, you can find out what we talked about in Part 1 instead of giving you a recap. So that we have more listeners

Shanna Tokarsky:
So moving on. So we have three topics that we’re gonna hit today and then we have another episode that we’re gonna follow up with and possibly another one if we can think of more things that we see often with our athletes and with ourselves. So anytime that we’re talking about issues, we are definitely still talking about ourselves as well. Today’s probably going to be a big one for me and you just based on the topics that we have. So no. Number 1.

Jeremie Tokarsky:
Or 4.

Shanna Tokarsky:
I met for. Yes. Sorry.

Jeremie Tokarsky:
Not working on. Why is it going to be a big one for us?

Shanna Tokarsky:
We’ll just. Just one of them is a really big one for us, actually. Two of them are. This one we’ve we’ve probably helped a little bit, but let’s let’s talk about this. So not working on weaknesses. So as an owner and programmer of the workouts, this is pretty easy for us to avoid. This is something that way.

Jeremie Tokarsky:
it’s not hard to avoid.

Shanna Tokarsky:
It’s. You’re right, it’s right. It’s easy to make this and not even see it as a mistake because we can, as the people in charge, quote unquote, can program workouts that we like and that we’re good at. If we wanted to all the time, that’s that would be something that we would enjoy it. Let me know. Coming in and crushing workouts and feeling good and, you know, all that kind of stuff. So if you’re not a gym owner, you’re not in charge of programming, then not working on your weakness. Looks like not showing up on the days where you see something you dislike. For example, there’s 100 Burpees in a workout and you skip every time there’s Burpees because you don’t like Burpees, who does?. And you want to avoid that, quote unquote, pain of going through the motions of that. So I think I mean, for the methodology of what we’re trying to do. You got a train out your weaknesses. You know that you can hide all you want by just not showing up. That’s great. But if you actually want to get better and you have goals to be better, then you have to show up on the days that you don’t want to. You have to show up on the days where there’s things programmed and you don’t want to do them. Are you suck at them. You have to show up on those days because that is how you get better by going through the stuff that you don’t like to do. Like if you don’t train. We said this the other day. If you don’t train your weaknesses, they’ll be exposed in competition, which may not mean anything for anybody. If you are if you’re not competing. But I think it’s relevant. People that aren’t competing to you because if you’re constantly avoiding your weaknesses, then I don’t see how you can possibly get better. If that’s your methodology. Would you add anything to that?

Jeremie Tokarsky:
Not really. I mean, it’s easy for. I mean, even if you aren’t a gym owner and you’re just a goer of the gym. Right. So maybe you don’t go to across the gym, but somehow or another somebody shared this podcast with you and you started listening to it and maybe, you know, whatever that is. You’re gonna do the things you like to do because they’re easy for you. So, I mean, I wouldn’t necessarily say easy. I use that term loosely, but there are things that you enjoy doing. I mean, don’t get me wrong, it’s hard to go to the gym, right? Even being in gym owner, it’s hard to get here some days. So and when it’s on those hard days that, you know, you already had a struggle to get here, you’ll typically gravitate towards the things that you enjoy doing. In, so to speak. So if it’s like if you like rowing opposed to running, you’ll row or running or you’ll bike instead of rowing or you’ll bike instead of running or you know, you’ll do back squats instead of front squats or back squats instead of overhead squats, whatever it is. And that’s what it is. Is that still a weakness like the weakness usually doesn’t? Is it just because, like, you know. You like doing a certain thing over another thing. Weakness can also show up in you’re not very good at a specific movement or thing. And so rather than just be great at it, you’re just good at it like I’m good at chest of our pull ups. Not great at chest to bar pull ups, I’m good at getting a couple of bar muscle ups under fatigue. Not great getting multiple reps at whatever it is under fatigue. And so like that. That scale is varying based on your level, based on like where you are. And your fitness journey is just you’ll come to find out that certain things that you once were not so good at turn out to be some of the things that you’re really great at. But the problem is, is you have not set enough time or set set aside enough time to work on that weakness to ever truly develop whether or not you’re good or bad at it. I don’t think anyone is really bad at anything. It’s just that you’re just bad at teaching the movement or bad at learning the movement or bad strengthening the movement. It’s not necessarily that you’re inherently un athletic. Right. Right. I mean, there’s a famous quote out there is like hard work. Hard work beats talent every day of the week. When talent doesn’t show up or something. I don’t know what it is. But anyway, that’s kind of the same thing. It’s like if you put it in the heart, if you put in the work and I’m not saying that all work is good work. Like, I mean, you can come in here and go through the motions. But I mean, saying if you put an actual diligent in hard work, I don’t think that there’s anything that you can that train that somebody else has done. Now, granted, they have a higher commitment level and there is some sorts. You know, there is some things like genetics and stuff like that. But at the end of the day is like it just comes down to who’s willing to put in the harder, who’s willing to put in more work than you. Right. And that’s one of the things that you always have as a competitive athlete is like somebody is out there training harder than you. Somebody is out there warming up with your one rep, Max. Right. And that’s kind of what you need to go into as as an athlete, as an athlete, but as like an everyday gym, gore like. If you’re training your weakness, you’re also training an imbalance. You’re also training something that you’re weaker at. Like. And that, in turn leads to less injuries, less less stress on certain body parts. Because, you know, if you go down to the anatomy of things, if it’s a small muscle group, like a larger muscle group is picking up the slack. So you need to develop the smaller muscle groups so that your larger muscle groups can work the way that they were designed and not trying to pick up some weird movement hat pattern and some weakness that just. Failed to exploit.

Shanna Tokarsky:
Right. Well, I think to you it doesn’t have to be just physical. It can also be weakness in like your mindset. You know what I mean? And that carries over that carries over into everything you do. So if your mindset, if there’s a weakness in your mindset that you quit when it gets hard, are you quit when things don’t go as planned? Because we all have plans to attack workouts in crossfit. Typically, we’re like, OK, for the workout starts really going. At least I do. I go into a workout. I’m like, mentally, I’m going to do 10 reps here and I’m on a break. And I’m going to do 10 or whatever, Mike. You know, whatever. I’m figuring out how I’m going to attack and finish this workout. But when they don’t go as planned. If that’s a weakness that every time things don’t go my way, which they never go your way in a workout because you always think they’re gonna go a certain way and they never turn out that way. Like if your weakness is that every time you get to a part in a workout and if you fall apart because it didn’t go as planned and you’re throwing things around and you’re mad at yourself or you’re, you know, huffing and puffing or taking all your energy to whine about it instead of push through, then that’s a weakness to me where you can. And so it’s not necessarily not showing up like we talked about cherry picking, like just showing up to the workouts that you like. But it’s also about how you behave in a workout.

Listen to the PodCast for more